Tome of Prowess (3.5e Sourcebook)

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Author: Tarkisflux (talk)
Contributors: Bigode,
IGTN,
MisterSinister,
Parakee,
TheDarkWad,
LeadPal
Date Created: Jan 22, 2008
Status: Edit pass 3 is a go.
Cleaning and unifying mechanics.
Editing: Clarity edits only please
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Introduction: The Importance of Skills[edit]

Welcome to the Tome of Prowess, Skills for the Mundane and the Masterful.

In the multiverse that D&D represents, people can begin their life as serfs and, through trials and challenges, end up as legendary heroes capable of amazing feats that rival the gods themselves. Some accomplish this by learning and exploiting the secret ways of the multiverse, using magic to accomplish what some look on as miracles. Others train themselves extensively, and accomplish feats beyond lesser mortals through will and skill alone. Skill points represent that skill and training, and they are the primary method of utility ability advancement for those who put in hard work instead of cheating with magic.

Or at least this is what D&D would like you to think, given the weight the designers placed on skill points and skills themselves. In reality though, the skill totals required to do amazing things are only acquired up in the epic levels, and by that point, spellcasters have been doing all of your fancy skill tricks for many levels and your neat trick just isn’t relevant. You’ve probably been doing it yourself with magic items and don’t even know or care that you can do it with that skill you’ve brought up with you.

This supplement for the 3.5 D&D game presents skills to correct that, but it does so by sacrificing the simplicity (and with it the irrelevance) of skills at mid and high levels. There’s a lot more abilities for each skill to keep track of with this modification. And that’s ok, because that’s what the non-spellcasting classes really need.

Contents[edit]

Chapter 1: Rules[edit]

General Rules
Retraining
Skill Bonus Changes
Converting to the Tome of Prowess

Chapter 2: The Revised Skills[edit]

Skill Summaries
Acrobatics
Affability
Appraisal
Arcana
Athletics
Bluff
Ciphers
Concentration
Creature Handling
Cultures
Devices
Dowsing
Endurance
Escape Artistry
Geomancy
Healing
Intimidation
Jump
Legerdemain
Perception
Psychology
Stealth
Survival
Thaumaturgy
Transformation

Chapter 3: Background Abilities[edit]

Overview
Types
Craft
Language
Occupation
Proficiency
Study
Grades
Checks
Starting Characters
Advancement by Skill Point

Chapter 4: Supporting Changes[edit]

Updated Class Features
Saving Throw Adjustments
Revised Animal Training Rules
Revised Movement and Fatigue Rules
Revised Pickpocketing Rules
Revised Riding Rules
Revised Spellcasting Interruption
Revised Tracking Rules

Chapter 5: Characters in a Skilled Game[edit]

Feats for the Skilled
Feat Descriptions
Scaling Feat Descriptions
Gear for the Skilled
Example Skill Items
Creating Magical Skill Gear
Magic for the Unskilled
Removed Spells
Rewritten Spell Descriptions

Chapter 6: Playing the Skills Game[edit]

The Combat Game
Skills as Mobility
Skills as Offense
Skills as Defenses
The Infiltration Game
The Perception Mini-Game
The Stealth Mini-Game
The Legerdemain Mini-Game
Other Infiltration Options
The Social Game
Making People Like You
Making People Do What You Want
Combining Skills

Chapter 7: Running a Skilled Game[edit]

Skillful Monsters
Skill Abilities Available to Monsters
Setting the DCs for Abilities Used Against Monsters
Running a Skilled Society

Chapter 8: Going Further[edit]

Using Tome of Prowess with...
Lycanthropy
Psionics
Tome of Battle
A Note on Balance
This modification, on its own, will add substantial power to the poor non-casters in the game, and a bit of power to the half casters. If completely utilized, it should bring the monk and fighter level classes up to or above rogue level, and allow all characters to contribute to the game longer than their chassis would normally allow. Keep in mind that if you prefer a lower power game, or your games don’t run past 9th level, this may not be something you should consider implementing. If your games often run into the high levels and you’re tired of fighters depending on magic items or casters to remain useful in the party, this is absolutely something you should consider thoroughly.

Credits[edit]

While this work is largely my own, there are people who contributed material or other support and should be recognized.



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Facts about "Tome of Prowess (3.5e Sourcebook)"RDF feed
Article BalanceHigh +
AuthorTarkisflux +
Completeness4 +
Identifier3.5e Sourcebook +
Rated ByLeziad +, Undead Knave +, MisterSinister +, Wildmage +, TK-Squared +, Foxwarrior +, Surgo + and DanielDraco +
RatingRated 3.8 / 4 +
SummarySkills for the mundane and the masterful. Skills that scale to all levels of the game and offer the skilled classes some of the utility previously only found within spells or items. +
TitleTome of Prowess +