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=== Polymorph Version 1: Character Replacement ===
 
=== Polymorph Version 1: Character Replacement ===
  
If you take part of your character – ''any'' part of your character – and part of a monster from one of the many monster books in <u>D&D</u>, and you put them together into a single <u>Voltron</u>-like body, you have broken <u>D&D</u>. That should be obvious, but since we are over six years into the ridiculous circus that is ''[[SRD:Polymorph|polymorph]]'' in 3rd edition <u>Dungeons and Dragons</u>, apparently it isn't. If it is important to you that you be allowed to dumpster dive through the monster books and find an appropriate monster to transform into, it is important to <u>D&D</u> that absolutely no part of your character be mixed and matched during that period. If you want to truly become a monster, you have to ''actually'' become that monster. Not "the monster with all my spell effects running", not "the monster with my formidable mental attributes. No. You need to become the monster ''exactly'' as it appears in the monster book or there's no chance of you getting a balanced result. Some people are going to end up as mediocre monsters with carry-over abilities that happen to synergize well and become tremendously powerful while other people are just as unbalanced in the other direction when they find that drawbacks of their character are carried over and overwrite the abilities of a monster that are supposed to make them any good at all.
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If you take part of your character – ''any'' part of your character – and part of a monster from one of the many monster books in D&D, and you put them together into a single Voltron-like body, you have broken D&D. That should be obvious, but since we are over six years into the ridiculous circus that is ''[[SRD:Polymorph|polymorph]]'' in 3rd edition Dungeons and Dragons, apparently it isn't. If it is important to you that you be allowed to dumpster dive through the monster books and find an appropriate to transform into, it is important to D&D that absolutely no part of your character be mixed and matched during that period. If you want to truly become a monster, you have to ''actually'' become that monster. Not "the monster with all my spell effects running", not "the monster with my formidable mental attributes. No. You need to become the monster ''exactly'' as it appears in the monster book or there's no chance of you getting a balanced result. Some people are going to end up as mediocre monsters with carry-over abilities that happen to synergize well and become tremendously powerful while other people are just as unbalanced in the other direction when they find that drawbacks of their character are carried over and overwrite the abilities of a monster that are supposed to make them any good at all.
  
 
And this isn't just hyperbole or doomsday predictions, this is established fact. We've all played with some of the multitude of different versions of Polymorph errata and "fixes", and the abject horror caused by every single iteration. The ''idea'' doesn't work. If you're going to replace any part of the character, you have to replace it all. So here's a version of ''polymorph'' that won't make us cry. This ain't rocket science, it just takes a little bit of discipline:
 
And this isn't just hyperbole or doomsday predictions, this is established fact. We've all played with some of the multitude of different versions of Polymorph errata and "fixes", and the abject horror caused by every single iteration. The ''idea'' doesn't work. If you're going to replace any part of the character, you have to replace it all. So here's a version of ''polymorph'' that won't make us cry. This ain't rocket science, it just takes a little bit of discipline:
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{{:Mass Polymorph, Tome (3.5e Spell)}}
 
{{:Mass Polymorph, Tome (3.5e Spell)}}
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=== Polymorph Version 2: Fixed Forms ===
 
=== Polymorph Version 2: Fixed Forms ===

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ComponentV + and S +
LevelSorcerer/Wizard 4 +, Sorcerer/Wizard 7 +, Bard 1 +, Sorcerer/Wizard 2 +, Sorcerer/Wizard 3 +, Sorcerer/Wizard 5 + and Sorcerer/Wizard 6 +
RangePersonal +, Medium + and Touch +
SchoolSRD:Transmutation School +
SummaryYou are transformed into a creature of your choosing. +, Target is transformed into an alternate creature (revised polymorph). +, Multiple targets are transformed into alternate creatures. +, Target assumes appearance and form of a humanoid. +, Target takes on the form of an animal or magical beast. +, Target assumes the form of a monster. +, Target gains form of a fiendish race, as well as some of their abilities. + and The target assumes the form of a huge dragon. +