User:Luigifan18/Somewhere Over The Rainbow (3.5e Maneuver)

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Author: Luigifan18 (talk)
Date Created: September 24, 2015
Status: Complete
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Somewhere Over The Rainbow
Setting Sun (Strike)
Level: 8
Prerequisite: 4 Setting Sun maneuvers
Initiation Action: 1 standard action
Range: Melee reach
Target: One creature
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: See text

Somewhere over the rainbow, way up high
I see a hapless schmuck hurtling through the sky.

This maneuver functions like mighty throw[1], except as noted below.

As part of initiating this maneuver, you attempt to trip your opponent, gaining a +8 bonus on the opposed Strength or Dexterity check. If you beat your foe, you do 6d6 damage to the foe and throw them high up into the air, peaking at a height of up to 10 feet per initiator level. (You don't have to throw your victim that high if you don't want to.) The horizontal distance also peaks at 10 feet away from you per initiator level; you can throw the victim towards any square within that distance. (Essentially, if you could move to a given square in a single move action if you had a movement speed of 10 ft./initiator level and complete intangibility (i.e. being able to pass through anything, including effects that would block intangible creatures, such as a wall of force, and being completely unaffected by difficult terrain and capable of ignoring differences in elevation), you can target that square for the victim of this maneuver to land in.) You choose the target square as part of the process of throwing the victim. Once the target square is chosen, the victim travels to the target square in a straight arc of effect (unless the arc of effect is interrupted, then see below), reaching its maximum height halfway through the line, and takes appropriate falling damage and falls prone upon reaching the target square (the total distance fallen could be greater or smaller than the maximum height of the throw, depending on the target square's elevation compared to the initiator's location). (Arc of effect is just like line of effect, except that it has height, meaning that it is not interrupted by obstacles on the ground if it has sufficient height to clear them at that point on the line, but is interrupted by ceilings and other obstacles in midair if its height at that point on the line matches the position of the obstacle.) The throw victim does not provoke attacks of opportunity for its movement, not even from creatures in midair.

The following clauses are special cases that resolve potential interruptions of the arc of effect, either due to a collision or the thrown creature having some way to interrupt its own momentum prior to reaching the target square. For ease of reference, the user of this maneuver is referred to as the initiator, the initial target of this maneuver (meaning, the creature that was thrown) is referred to as the throw victim, a creature that the arc of effect passes through is referred to as a collision victim, and a wall, ceiling, or other object that interrupts the arc of effect is referred to either as an obstacle, as an object, or as whatever it happens to be.

  • Throw Victim Capable of Flight: If the throw victim is capable of flight, it is entitled to a Reflex save to stabilize itself at the peak of the throw (halfway through the arc of effect). This Reflex save has a DC of 18 + the initiator's Strength modifier. The throw victim takes a bonus or penalty to its Reflex save according to its maneuverability grade: −4 if clumsy, −2 if poor, +0 if average, +2 if good, +4 if perfect. If the throw victim succeeds on its Reflex save, it stabilizes itself and uses the momentum of the throw to begin flying, averting its painful collision with the ground; it moves no further until its next turn, at which point it can begin moving as usual, according to its maneuverability grade. Its initial direction of movement is the same as the direction it was moving as a consequence of being thrown. If the throw victim fails its Reflex save, it is unable to stabilize itself and continues along the arc of effect until it collides with something or hits the ground.
  • Throw Victim Capable of Hovering: See "Throw Victim Capable of Flight", except that the Reflex save is only attempted at the peak of the throw if that height is equal to or greater than the throw victim's maximum hovering height; otherwise, the Reflex save is attempted at the throw victim's maximum hovering height. If the throw victim succeeds on its Reflex save, it stabilizes itself and begins hovering, averting its painful collision with the ground; it moves no further until its next turn, at which point it can begin moving as usual, according to its maneuverability grade. Its initial direction of movement is the same as the direction it was moving as a consequence of being thrown. If the throw victim fails its Reflex save, it is unable to stabilize itself and continues along the arc of effect until it collides with something or hits the ground.
  • Throw Victim Capable of Alternative Means of Modifying Midair Momentum: See "Throw Victim Capable of Flight", except that alternative means of modifying midair momentum (such as bamf, teleport, Double Jump, Surge of Motion, etc.) are a step below even clumsy flight, and so the throw victim takes a −6 penalty to its Reflex save. As with flight, the Reflex save is attempted at the peak height of the throw. If the throw victim succeeds on its Reflex save, it successfully stabilizes itself and can use its means of adjusting its midair momentum (whatever that may be) at any point before hitting the ground; if that means has an action cost, then that action cost must be paid, and if the cost is anything other than an immediate action or attack action, it is taken from the throw victim's next turn. If the action cost is an attack action, it is consumed in the form of an attack of opportunity; if the throw victim has no remaining attacks of opportunity, then it is treated as though it failed on its Reflex save. If the throw victim fails its Reflex save or is incapable of paying the action cost of its means of modifying its midair momentum (even from its next turn), it is unable to stabilize itself and continues along the arc of effect until it collides with something or hits the ground.
  • Throw Victim Passes by Wall without Colliding: If the arc of effect is parallel to a wall at any point along its length (meaning that the wall exists at the same height as the arc of effect along that point on the arc of effect), the wall is within the natural reach of the throw victim, and the throw victim has either a climb speed or at least 18 ranks in Climb, then the throw victim is entitled to a Reflex save to react to the wall 20 feet before the point in the arc of effect where it would pass by it. Attempting this Reflex save requires an attack of opportunity or an immediate action; if the throw victim is unable or unwilling to expend either, it forfeits this saving throw. The Reflex save works like the Reflex save for stabilization, and has the same DC, except instead of applying a bonus or penalty according to a maneuverability grade (or lack thereof), the throw victim applies a modifier equal to ½C − 12, where C is the throw victim's total modifier to Climb checks (Strength modifier, ranks in Climb, racial modifiers, feat bonuses, etc.); this modifier is applied regardless of whether it is positive or negative, meaning that it can be a bonus or a penalty. If the throw victim succeeds on the Reflex save, then upon passing by the wall, it can attempt a Climb check to catch itself, as if it were climbing on that wall and had fallen off. If it succeeds on the Climb check by 9 or less, it catches itself on the wall and interrupts its movement, averting its painful collision with the ground, but it instead takes 1d6 damage for every 20 feet of horizontal movement that it had left to travel; if it succeeds by 10 or more, it catches on to the wall without injuring itself in the process. If it fails on the Climb check, it misses the wall and hurtles right past it, continuing along the arc of effect until it collides with something, passes by another wall, or hits the ground.
  • Throw Victim Has Ukemi: Ukemi cannot be used until the throw victim hits the ground (either naturally or after colliding with something and falling to the ground), or collides with a wall or creature.
  • Collision With Ceiling:
    • On the way up: If the throw victim collides with a ceiling, both the throw victim and the ceiling take 1d6 damage for every 10 feet of vertical distance the throw victim had left to travel. If this destroys the segment of the ceiling subjected to the collision, the throw victim breaks through and continues traveling upwards; chances are, it will end up landing on top of whatever surface that ceiling happened to be (such as the roof of a building, the next floor up, or the surface). It is completely possible to collide with multiple ceilings if in a multi-tiered structure, as long as the collision damage is sufficient to break through each ceiling, and the throw victim will take damage from each collision in this catastrophic scenario. If a ceiling is not destroyed by collision damage, it interrupts the arc of effect and disrupts the throw victim's momentum, and they immediately stop moving and drop down to the ground in a square near the point where their momentum was interrupted, taking the appropriate fall damage. Roll 1d10 to determine where the throw victim lands. If the result is anywhere from 1 through 8, the throw victim lands 1d2×5 feet in that direction away from the point where they hit the ceiling, like a splash weapon landing off-target. If the result is 9, the throw victim lands on the square where the arc of effect was interrupted. If the result is 10, reroll until a result other than 10 is obtained; if the final result is 1 through 8, add 5 feet to the deviation distance per result of 10 on the d10 roll.
    • At throw peak: The throw victim's vertical velocity is rapidly falling to zero. The chance of a collision with a ceiling is extremely remote, and if one does happen, it will be inconsequential unless the ceiling is covered with spikes or something. So don't worry about it unless the ceiling itself is harmful; in that case, roll a d%, and apply the ceiling's harmful effects on a result of 90 or higher.
    • On the way down: It is physically impossible to collide with a ceiling if one is not traveling upwards.
  • Collision With Wall:
    • On the way up: Both the throw victim and the wall take 1d6 damage per 10 feet of horizontal movement the throw victim had left to travel. If this destroys the wall, the throw victim continues traveling onwards, out to the end of the arc of effect (or, alternatively, until it gets a chance to interrupt its movement or collides with something else). If the wall survives, the throw victim's momentum is halted, and if it has a climb speed or at least 18 ranks in Climb, it has a chance to catch itself on the wall with a successful Climb check (on a success of 10 or more, the damage it would have taken from the impact is halved). If it fails the Climb check or is unable to attempt one, it falls off the wall and plummets straight down to the ground, taking falling damage as appropriate upon landing (though this may not be a problem for a monk).
    • At throw peak: Same as "On the way up".
    • On the way down: Same as "On the way up".
  • Collision With Grounded Object:
    • On the way up: There are two possibilities here; either the throw victim collides with the underside of the obstacle, or they collide with a vertical-facing side. While there's probably some mathematical formula involving the victim's rate of ascent and the precise position of the object in three-dimensional space that could be performed to determine which of those the throw victim collides with, it's much too complicated to bother with. Just assume that there's a 80% probability of colliding with a vertical-facing side and a probability of 20% of colliding with the underside, and roll a d% to find out what happens. (These probabilities assume a mostly vertical object with some sort of outcropping or overhang that makes it not perfectly vertical; they will probably be different depending on the shape of the object, so the DM should be willing to adjust them according to the demands of common sense.) If the throw victim collides with the underside of the obstacle, treat it like a collision with a ceiling; if the throw victim collides with a vertical-facing side, treat it like a collision with a wall.
    • At throw peak: The throw victim collides with a vertical-facing surface on the obstacle. See "Collision with Wall".
    • On the way down: There are two possibilities here; either the throw victim collides with the top of the obstacle, or they collide with a vertical-facing side. While there's probably some mathematical formula involving the victim's rate of descent and the precise position of the object in three-dimensional space that could be performed to determine which of those the throw victim collides with, it's much too complicated to bother with. Just assume that there's a 80% probability of colliding with a vertical-facing side and a probability of 20% of colliding with the top, and roll a d% to find out what happens. (These probabilities assume a mostly vertical object with some sort of outcropping or overhang that makes it not perfectly vertical; they will probably be different depending on the shape of the object, so the DM should be willing to adjust them according to the demands of common sense.) If the throw victim collides with the top of the obstacle, they have effectively landed on top of it instead of the ground; the throw victim stops moving and takes fall damage according to how far it fell before impact. If the throw victim collides with a vertical-facing side, treat it like a collision with a wall.
  • Collision With Aerial Object:
    • On the way up: There are two possibilities here; either the throw victim collides with the underside of the obstacle, or they collide with a vertical-facing side. While there's probably some mathematical formula involving the victim's rate of ascent and the precise position of the object in three-dimensional space that could be performed to determine which of those the throw victim collides with, it's much too complicated to bother with. Just assume that there's a 50% probability of either and roll a d% to find out what happens. (These probabilities assume a cube-shaped object; they will probably be different depending on the shape of the object, so the DM should be willing to adjust them according to the demands of common sense.) If the throw victim collides with the underside of the obstacle, treat it like a collision with a ceiling; if the throw victim collides with a vertical-facing side, treat it like a collision with a wall.
    • At throw peak: The throw victim collides with a vertical-facing surface on the obstacle. See "Collision with Wall".
    • On the way down: There are two possibilities here; either the throw victim collides with the top of the obstacle, or they collide with a vertical-facing side. While there's probably some mathematical formula involving the victim's rate of descent and the precise position of the object in three-dimensional space that could be performed to determine which of those the throw victim collides with, it's much too complicated to bother with. Just assume that there's a 50% probability of either and roll a d% to find out what happens. (These probabilities assume a cube-shaped object; they will probably be different depending on the shape of the object, so the DM should be willing to adjust them according to the demands of common sense.) If the throw victim collides with the top of the obstacle, they have effectively landed on top of it instead of the ground, and what happens next depends on whether or not the obstacle can support the throw victim's weight. If it can, then the throw victim stops moving and takes fall damage according to how far it fell before impact. If it can't, then the throw victim takes fall damage according to how far it fell before impact, and its horizontal momentum is interrupted, but the object falls out from under it, and both the obstacle and the throw victim take fall damage according to the new distance between them and the ground. If the throw victim collides with a vertical-facing side, treat it like a collision with a wall.
  • Collision with Grounded Creature:
    • On the way up: The collision victim is entitled to a Reflex save to avoid the impact (DC = 18 + initiator's Strength modifier + throw victim's size modifier to grapple checks − 1 per 50 feet of horizontal distance the throw victim has already traveled). If this saving throw succeeds, the collision victim completely escapes being injured, and the throw victim continues traveling as though it hasn't been interrupted (because, in truth, it hasn't). If the Reflex save fails, both the throw victim and collision victim take 1d6 damage per 10 feet of horizontal distance the throw victim had left to travel, plus 1 damage per 10 feet of vertical distance the throw victim had left to travel. If the collision victim is felled by this damage, the throw victim continues traveling outwards for the remainder of the distance (or, alternatively, until it gets a chance to interrupt its movement or collides with something else). If the collision victim is still conscious, it must immediately make a Fortitude save (DC = 18 + initiator's Strength modifier + throw victim's size modifier to grapple checks + ½ damage sustained from the collision); the collision victim applies its own size modifier to grapple checks to this Fortitude save. On a failure of 5 or more, the collision victim is knocked prone, and the throw victim continues traveling outwards for the remainder of the distance (or, alternatively, until it gets a chance to interrupt its movement or collides with something else). On a failure of 4 or less, the collision victim is knocked prone, and the throw victim's movement is interrupted; it immediately falls to the ground, taking the appropriate falling damage, and falls prone. On a success, the collision victim remains standing, and the throw victim's movement is interrupted; it immediately falls to the ground, taking the appropriate falling damage, and falls prone.
    • At throw peak: Same as "On the way up", except that as there is no more vertical distance to be traveled, the throw victim and collision victim simply take 1d6 damage per 10 feet left in the throw victim's horizontal movement.
    • On the way down: Same as "At throw peak".
  • Collision with Aerial Creature:
    • On the way up: The collision victim is entitled to a Reflex save to avoid the impact (DC = 18 + initiator's Strength modifier + throw victim's size modifier to grapple checks − 1 per 50 feet of horizontal distance the throw victim has already traveled). If this succeeds, the collision victim completely escapes being injured, and the throw victim continues traveling as though it hasn't been interrupted (because, in truth, it hasn't). If the Reflex save fails, both the throw victim and collision victim take 1d6 damage per 10 feet of horizontal distance the throw victim had left to travel, plus 1 damage per 10 feet of vertical distance the throw victim had left to travel. If the collision victim is felled by this damage, the throw victim continues traveling outwards for the remainder of the distance (or, alternatively, until it gets a chance to interrupt its movement or collides with something else). If the collision victim is still conscious, it must immediately make a Fortitude save (DC = 18 + initiator's Strength modifier + throw victim's size modifier to grapple checks + ½ damage sustained from the collision); the collision victim applies its own size modifier to grapple checks to this Fortitude save. On a failure of 5 or more, the collision victim is knocked out of the sky, and the throw victim continues traveling outwards for the remainder of the distance (or, alternatively, until it gets a chance to interrupt its movement or collides with something else); the collision victim falls directly down to the ground, traveling 10 feet horizontally for every 20 feet left in the throw victim's horizontal movement in the same direction as the throw victim, and takes the appropriate falling damage upon impact with the ground, falling prone in the process. On a failure of 4 or less, the collision victim is knocked out of the sky and falls directly down to the ground, traveling 10 feet horizontally for every 20 feet left in the throw victim's horizontal movement in the same direction as the throw victim, and takes the appropriate falling damage upon impact with the ground, falling prone in the process. However, the throw victim's movement is interrupted; it immediately falls to the ground, taking the appropriate falling damage, and falls prone. On a success, the collision victim remains in midair, and the throw victim's movement is interrupted; it immediately falls to the ground, taking the appropriate falling damage, and falls prone. If the collision victim is knocked out of the sky, and collides with a wall in the process, both the collision victim and the wall take 1d6 damage per 10 feet remaining in the collision victim's horizontal movement (just like in the case of the throw victim colliding with a wall).
    • At throw peak: Same as "On the way up", except that as there is no more vertical distance to be traveled, the throw victim and collision victim simply take 1d6 damage per 10 feet left in the throw victim's horizontal movement.
    • On the way down: Same as "At throw peak", except that if the collision victim fails its Fortitude save, it travels 10 feet horizontally for every 10 feet left in the throw victim's horizontal movement as it falls to the ground. If the collision victim fails its Fortitude save by 5 or more (and therefore does not interrupt the throw victim's horizontal movement), this results in the throw victim landing right on top of it, pinning the collision victim in addition to knocking it prone; this also causes 2d6 extra damage to the collision victim and converts 1d6 of the falling damage taken by the throw victim to nonlethal damage. (The collision victim may or may not be able to easily escape the pin, depending on the relative grappling capability of it and the throw victim and the throw victim's willingness to maintain the pin.)
  • Collision with Creature On Landing Square: The collision victim must succeed on a Reflex save (DC = 18 + initiator's Strength modifier + throw victim's size modifier to grapple checks) to get out of the way before impact. On success, it takes no damage, but on a failure, it takes damage equal to the fall damage the throw victim sustained and is knocked prone. On a failure of 5 or more, the collision victim is pinned beneath the throw victim and takes an additional 2d6 damage, while 1d6 of the falling damage sustained by the throw victim is converted to nonlethal damage. (The collision victim may or may not be able to easily escape the pin, depending on the relative grappling capability of it and the throw victim and the throw victim's willingness to maintain the pin.)



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